Capsular Contracture

When the body reacts to a breast implant in a way that can change the form of the breast and cause pain, it is known as capsular contracture.

What is it?

The scar tissue that develops around the breast implant tightens, a condition known as capsular contracture. The tightening is referred to as “contracture,” and the scar tissue is known as the “capsule” and is normal. This is also frequently referred to as the breast “hardening” as a result of breast implant surgery.

Treatment Areas

There are a couple of ways that capsular contracture can be treated.

During a capsulectomy, your doctor will remove the current implant and the tissue capsule that surrounds it. The replacement implant will then be inserted and covered in a layer of dermal matrix material (a skin substitute made mostly of collagen). The dermal matrix material offers an additional layer of protection, and the body will create a fresh capsule of scar tissue to enclose it.

During an open capsulotomy, your plastic surgeon may make a few small incisions in the tissue covering the implant in an effort to split the capsule open. Some of the capsules may also be removed. The capsule should break open, giving the implant additional space to navigate. Your surgeon may occasionally remove your current implant and replace it with a new one.

In an autologous reconstruction, your plastic surgeon will remove your implant and replace it with a flap of tissue from another part of your body, such as your belly or buttocks. This method has the significant benefit of removing the possibility of recurrent capsular contracture because a tissue capsule won’t form around a flap. In contrast to a capsulectomy or open capsulotomy, autologous reconstruction is a more difficult procedure with a lengthier recovery period.

Am I a good Candidate?

Your risk of having capsular contracture can significantly rise if you have ever received radiation therapy, especially if it came after your initial breast reconstruction surgery. Overall, however, it is unclear why some people get capsular contracture while others do not.

A ruptured implant, a hematoma (a collection of blood where the tissue was removed during surgery), the formation of a microbial biofilm (a subclinical infection) on an implant, and a genetic propensity for scarring are a few other variables that could increase the risk of capsular contracture.

If you have experienced any of the above-mentioned situations or any discomfort in your breasts after surgery, book an appointment with our specialists to have an examination.

Side Effects & Risks

Capsular contracture may lead to extremely firm and painful breasts that will cause the patient discomfort and distress.

Reviews

Some of our satisfied patients who have received treatment for capsular contracture from us share their thoughts regarding their comfortable experience.

If you have further queries, check out our FAQ’s section to get greater clarification.

Some of our satisfied patients who have received treatment for capsular contracture from us share their thoughts regarding their comfortable experience.

If you have further queries, check out our FAQ’s section to get greater clarification.

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